9 Steps to Help Manage Covid-19 Anxiety and Depression

After weeks of Covid-19 Pandemic news and living in quarantine, it’s understandable that a significant portion of us are experiencing elevated levels of anxiety, fear, stress and depression.

After weeks of Covid-19 Pandemic news and living in quarantine, it’s understandable that a significant portion of us are experiencing elevated levels of anxiety, fear, stress and depression.

Although we may have had periods of anxiety and stress in our lives, few of us have experienced it at these elevated levels, and for this extended period of time.

Here are Covid-19 mental health statistics from Healthline, as of May 25th.

  • 73% of those polled consider Covid-19 news to be overwhelming
  • 49% are showing some signs of depression
  • 60% fear contracting the coronavirus
  • 49% of those currently seeking therapy are new patients

 

Sadly, Covid-19 is not going away any time soon. With the possibility of a vaccine or effective treatment still months away, we must learn to live with this coronavirus and cope with the related anxiety and stress.

To paraphrase Winston Churchill, ‘This is not even the beginning of the end, but perhaps it is the end of the beginning’.

Here are 9 steps you can take to help manage the anxiety and stress of Covid-19.

If you follow most of these steps, and utilize CBD supplements, you should start to feel just a bit more ‘normal’ and in control.

  1. Breathe
  2. Eat well
  3. Exercise
  4. Practice gratitude
  5. Manage alcohol or any other recreational drug use
  6. Establish a schedule
  7. Limit news/social media consumption
  8. Try to stay optimistic
  9. Consider CBD supplements

 

Is CBD safe?

Studies show that CBD is a safe, non-addictive substance, that influences the CB1 and CB2 receptors of the body’s largest neurotransmitter network, the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system is a balancing system for your body that manages multiple areas including mood, pain, inflammation and memory.

In the past 9 years, there have been numerous research studies and clinical trials that have shown potential benefits of CBD. One early study, published in Neuropsychopharmacology, February 2011, showed reduction of anxiety/fear induced by simulated public speaking for individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder.

CBD has also shown potential benefits for those suffering with PTSD. A 2018 review of multiple studies concluded that CBD may offer therapeutic benefits for disorders related to to traumatic stress and memories.”

Studies have also shown CBD to be safe with minimal possible side effects, particularly when compared to current medicines used to treat anxiety, depression and PTSD.

For your safety, always verify you are buying pure, organic, tested and guaranteed CBD products.

Pure, organic CBD is available in a wide range of products, from gel caps to edibles, oils and beverage powders. Before you purchase CBD oil or any CBD supplement, do your research and confirm that the CBD products you are considering are pure, organic, tested by a 3rd party lab and guaranteed.

Our mission at PureCBD.Solutions is to help you find pure, organic, tested and guaranteed CBD products from recommended and trusted brands.

Research

Cannabidiol reduces the anxiety induced by simulated public speaking
Neuropsychopharmacology, February 2011

Pretreatment with CBD significantly reduced anxiety, cognitive impairment and discomfort in their speech performance, and significantly decreased alert in their anticipatory speech.

Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, December 2012

It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis.

Effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in generalized social anxiety disorder
Journal of Psychopharmacology, September 2010

Relative to placebo, CBD was associated with significantly decreased subjective anxiety